5 Resume Building Activities to Engage in NOW

As the Education Director for AOE, I have had the pleasure of reviewing many resumes that come across my desk. I can honestly say resumes have evolved in the last few years. Some are amazingly visual with graphics, headshots, and even a splash of color! While classic designs are still king in my book, it’s clear that a well-crafted, thoughtful resume is as important as ever.

 

resume-tips

The unique thing about a resume is its ability to encapsulate your entire professional career in one or two sheets of paper, while at the same time highlighting your unique passions and talents. A great resume cannot be thrown together the night before a big interview. It needs to grow and develop along with your professional endeavors. Think of your resume as a blank canvas with the amazing potential to display the “art” of your professional career!

If you are considering a job change, or even if you are unsure where the next chapter of life may lead, there is no time like the present to push up your sleeves and tackle projects that will ultimately make your resume stand apart from the rest. I’ve put together a list of five resume building activities to engage in now to help curate an amazing show piece. These tips will make sure your resume is primed and ready when opportunity knocks.

  1. Attend Conferences – Conference attendance is one way to demonstrate life-long learning. If you missed the fall conference season or couldn’t afford to travel this year, fear not! Many conferences, like AOE’s Art Ed Now, are online and can be attended from the comfort of your own home (in your PJs if you choose!) And it doesn’t have to be an Art Ed conference to count. If you are interested in a particular topic, like Makerspaces or STEAM, look around and see what is available. Any conference or webinar you attend is a great addition to your resume.
  2. Create – Dust off your art supplies and give yourself the time you need to explore creative endeavors. Administrators LOVE to see practicing artist-teachers. It means that you practice what you preach and that your passion for art education is deeply-seated. If you need to jumpstart your creative juices, consider enrolling in a studio class or treat yourself to a new sketchbook. And make sure to showcase your work in a way that is easy to share, such as a direct link to a professional portfolio or website.
  3. Develop Your Passion – A resume is a perfect place to highlight all the work you have done in a particular area. I am talking about work you do that is above and beyond expectations including books you have read, networking you have pursued, classrooms you have observed all because you were driven to learn more about a topic. If you spent the last two years fine-tuning video and editing skills and are now a master of flipped instruction, for example, this should be highlighted on your resume. Taking the initiative to develop a passion demonstrates ingenuity, drive, and perseverance. Passion is one of my favorite things to look for on a resume.
  4. Connect with the Community – Community involvement takes many forms. This would include actively communicating with parents through technology, like a classroom Instagram account or website. It could also include community art shows and displays with business partners, and collaborative efforts with staff outside of the art room. Taking the time to connect with those outside of your classroom demonstrates excellent communication and advocacy skills. It tells administrators you are a respected teacher and your program is worth sharing.
  5. Be a Leader – It’s no secret Art Education needs advocates, so take a look around and see what you can do to be a leader in the field. You could put together a PD presentation for a staff meeting, join the Leadership Team in your building, help run state conferences, lead an after school art club, etc. There are lots of ways to tick this box, so find an opportunity that fits with your personality. Taking the initiative to go the extra mile denotes confidence and the ability to cooperate for the greater good.

In addition to working on the items listed above, you will also want to keep a list that includes all the amazing things you do. A Google Doc works well, or try out this handy download to keep your resume current.

Click for free download!

Download Now!

I hope my suggestions will encourage you to continue to grow a resume that truly highlights all your amazing skills and work.

What does your resume look like?

What other items would you add to this list?

Heather Crockett

Heather is AOE’s Dean of the Institution and an expert in differentiation, curriculum development, and assessment. She is a veteran teacher in the art room and at the graduate level.

Related

  • Kelly Phillips

    Thanks Heather! It’s nice to get a reminder to keep up on your resume game. It’s easy to forget all the amazing stuff we do when it comes time to write it all down.

  • Thanks for the resume document that is very helpful.

  • Sue Perry

    These are great tips for resume’ revamp or building. I would also suggest adding skills that cross over from art education to all academic areas such as knowledge relating to: Maker spaces, technology (podcasts, blogs, web page, digital design, video chats with experts, using devices with students, etc.), incorporating writing – science – math – engineering processes, working to build leadership skills in students, collaborations with teachers in other areas, pedagogy innovations like strategies to reach students who do not identify as visual learners, classroom management systems such as PBIS, etc.

  • Mary Twomey

    After a long career as an Art Director and designer I made the switch to teaching art, which I have been doing for about 2 1/2 years now. I am updating my resume to include my current position, in order to do this I need to make adjustments to not exceed two pages. I am not sure what to keep now I have more professional teaching experience. Do I remove the student teaching and keep my previous professional experience? Or should I abbreviate the section detailing my previous career? I would love some advice. Thanks!