Streamline Your Instruction this School Year with Videos!

It’s safe to say most of us have experienced déjà vu when presenting new topics to our students. With dozens of classes each week, our words, thoughts, and memories can blur and run together. It’s easy to leave things out or present information inconsistently.

Don’t fret, there are solutions! We CAN ensure consistency for each of our classes with videos.

Here are three places you can find great videos to streamline your instruction.

1. Make Your Own

I could talk for days about making your own videos and flipping your lessons. It’s easy to get started – all you need is a recording device. You can create videos demonstrating specific techniques or routines or even create videos that introduce artists or concepts.

color wheel video

These can be viewed as whole classes, small groups, or on an individual basis as students need them. If you’re interested in learning more, check out the course Flipping the Art Room, and head into the new year with a slew of videos ready to go.

2. Check out the Getting to Know Series

I know we’re all familiar with the Getting to Know the World’s Greatest Artists books and DVDs. But, have you heard about their NEW series of DVDs, All About Art? They currently have four different instructional programs. These videos are created for the K-4 crowd and can be purchased individually or in sets. However, you could definitely use them as review material with older students as well.

Getting to Know DVDs

The All About Art Series currently has these titles available:

There are three fantastic things about using these videos to supplement your curriculum. The first is that the videos are actually engaging for younger students. My kindergarten and 1st-grade students absolutely love the Color in Art video and ask for it often.

students watching moving

The second  is that these videos can be viewed in their entirety or in smaller clips. Each chapter presents a new concept or material so you can pick and choose what you need. For example, there is a chapter in the Color in Art video that focuses just on warm and cool colors while another focuses on values, tints, and shades.

video chapters

Finally, these videos are perfect for a sub to use while you’re out as an introduction to a simple lesson.

3. Search YouTube

YouTube is a source of endless possibilities. There are many videos demonstrating techniques and skills. These are perfect for helping students at varied levels in your art room!

YouTube has shorter clips from movies and documentaries. And, also broadcasts featuring specific artists, movements, and concepts. It might take a little work on your part to compile and preview a great list, but you can make playlists for students to watch as a series or for a specific project.

To get you started, here are some of our favorite flipped channels and Pinterest Boards. You also don’t want to miss the fabulous Cassie Stephens and all her fantastic videos.

flipped Pinterest board

Whether you want to save your voice, your sanity, or your memory, you’ll want to check out all these options for videos and tutorials for your art room. The time invested will absolutely pay off! Try making a video of your own, check out one of the Getting to Know Art DVDs, or start perusing YouTube for valuable resources for your art room.

How do you use videos in the art room?

Do you have a YouTube playlist you’d be willing to share in the comments below?

Alecia Eggers Kaczmarek

Alecia is an elementary art teacher in central Iowa who is passionate about teaching and reaching her students with an innovative and meaningful arts education.

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  • Allie Rimkunas

    Three years ago I was trying to figure out how to teach my adapted art students. They would wander in with their assistants and I never knew if they were going to run around and throw chairs or eat markers or bite me or all of the above. They ranged from k-5. I couldn’t rely on any of them to sit quietly while I explained the lesson. I tried writing the directions on the board but the ed techs didn’t have time to look and read while keeping the kids under control.
    Our wonderful O.T. came up with the brilliant solution of videotaping the lessons. I was really reticent at first because it seemed that it would be a lot of extra work. But I decided to give it a try. I keep it simple but silly, no script, one take (props help!). Now the kids come in, sit on the rug, and wait with baited breath. They especially love the end when I play it backward for them. Even if they don’t totally understand the directions, their helpers do and can help them out.